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 Post subject: Re: Inner Game books
PostPosted: Tue Jul 31, 2012 7:07 am 
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Fresh Fish

Joined: Thu Jul 19, 2012 3:01 am
Posts: 9
Mariano wrote:
The Power of Now by Eckhart Tolle
- For me, this book just blowed my mind by making me aware of the distinction between me and my mind. I can only recommend half the book, cause I only read till the first half though. It was just like . . . . . . ...WOW. It's like it disconected me from the matrix of my mind and into the 'real' world. Someone in a skype call talked about how the sequel, A New Earth is like TPoN but more concise, streamlined, an improved version; I haven't read more than the first few pages but it feels like more of the same, in a smaller and more readable package- which is great.

i love this book - awesome shit


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 01, 2012 12:41 am 
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Fresh Fish

Joined: Thu Jul 19, 2012 3:01 am
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http://zelands.com/

I have to reccomend Transurfing. Its written by a physicist Vadim Zeland. It explains how to perceive world in better way and how to use laws of physics and energy in best way for you, and automatically for everybody else. connection man! ;)

'Those who have tried Transurfing, have experienced amazement, verging on ecstasy. The surrounding world of transurfers changes in an inexplicable way, literally before their very eyes. Those who ventured to employ these methods in everyday life were astonished (perhaps, even frightened) by how real and effective they are.'


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 02, 2012 7:45 pm 
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Dr. Phil

Joined: Wed Aug 01, 2012 1:43 pm
Posts: 160
The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People by the late Stephen Covey is an amazing book. Most of the principles I live my life by have origins in this book. Some of his ideas include being the original creator of your own life, prioritising more important tasks and seeking first to understand before being understood.

The Slight Edge by Jeff Olson - also fantastic. It highlights that there really isn't much separating someone who seems to be an effortless master than someone who has seemingly been around forever but is still "rubbish". He highlights certain principles these people that are "top-notch" follow, although there is one overlying one that really stands out: Consistency.

Think and Grow Rich by Napoleon Hill is great for shifting over your mind from "poor" thinking to "rich" thinking. Bob Proctor's You Were Born Rich has a similar mantra (he also mentions "Let Go and Let God" which to me means don't be an overcontrolling micromanager, especially of yourself and stop trying to control the uncontrollable).

I really like Paul Dobransky, in the right hands his material is brilliant; in the wrong hands he looks like (and could turn people into) a fruit loop.

I tend to rant and rave as well as give good recommendations so I'll stew over some more books I've read. There's plenty I'm looking forward to reading but spare time is limited (or really, wasted/allocated towards doing other things). My central message to this thread is that you need to have the mindset of an individual, of yourself and see where the principles can be applied. This prevents blind agreeing or disagreeing.


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 13, 2012 6:39 am 
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Endgame Aficionado

Joined: Wed Aug 01, 2012 10:16 am
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Ki In Daily Life by Koichi Tohei. Ki or "Chi" is described as a life force and how we can use it to our advantage. Martial Arts can be seen as a way of self-defense. But how often do we get to actually use it to defend ourselves? Why not simply just use it in everyday life? This is what Tohei talks about and has many demonstrations you can do. Koichi Tohei was one of the students of O-sensei, the founder of Aikido. Great book, and if you liked the "Focus Formula" in the Endgame bonuses, you will definitely like this book.


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 01, 2012 10:17 pm 
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Dr. Phil

Joined: Wed Jun 09, 2010 10:42 am
Posts: 234
The Book of Secrets by Osho
It is a commentary on the Vigyan Bhairav Tantra, a Book from Hindu culture, which is a Dialogue between Devi and Shakti, where Devi asks shakti questions about being and the essence of the universe and shakti answers with 112 simple meditation techniques (all just 2 lines and a lot of them quite the same). Osho gives a great commentary on over a thousand pages and pours his wisdom into you in his simple and powerful language. He stresses, that this is a book about technique, not about religion or belief. You don't have to believe anything for it to work. He says Tantra is a form of science, because you can recreate it in your lab (yourself) and re-experience it first hand. So it is not a religion, it is a manual for enlightenement, one could say.


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 Post subject: Re: Inner Game books
PostPosted: Tue Oct 09, 2012 5:09 pm 
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Fresh Fish

Joined: Wed Oct 03, 2012 4:20 pm
Posts: 24
Thought I'd add my 2 cents:

Get Out of Your Mind and Into Your Life by Steven C. Hayes and Steven C. Hayes

I HIGHLY recommend this book. It's based on ACT therapy (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acceptance ... nt_Therapy) and teaches you to explore the distinction between who you are as a conscious human being and the private experiences (thoughts, feelings, emotions, bodily sensations, memories) your brain tells you is who you are. THIS BOOK CHANGED MY LIFE.

Here's a Q&A with the authors from Amazon to help clarify some points:

"Amazon.com: Can you give us a lay person's primer on acceptance and commitment therapy?

Steven Hayes: Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) is based on a rather remarkable fact: when normal problem solving skills are applied to psychologically painful thoughts or feelings, suffering often increases. Our research program has shown this in thousands of patients, in almost every area of human suffering. Fortunately, we have discovered why this is and we have developed some ways of correcting it.

The basic research underlying ACT shows that entanglement with your own mind leads automatically to experiential avoidance: the tendency to try first to remove or change negative thoughts and feelings as a method of life enhancement. This attempted sequence makes negative thoughts and feelings more central, important, and fearsome--and often decreasing the ability to be flexible, effective, and happy.

The trick that traps us is that these unhelpful mental processes are fed by agreement OR disagreement. Your mind is like a person who has to be right about everything. If you know any people like that you know that they are excited when you agree with them but they can be even more excited and energized when you argue with them! Minds are like that. So what do you do?

ACT teaches you what to do. I will say what that is, but readers need to understand that these mere words will not be useful in and of themselves. Minds are too clever for that! That is why the book has so many exercises and why we have a free discussion group on line for people working through the book (http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/AC ... he_Public/). What ACT teaches is acceptance of emotions, mindful awareness of thoughts, contact with a transcendent sense of self, and action based on chosen values. This constellation of skills has shown itself in controlled research to help with an amazingly large range of problems, from anxiety to managing the challenges of physical disease, from depression, to stopping smoking.

Amazon.com: Some of this work is said to have come from your own battles with anxiety and panic. How did these ideas apply to your own struggles?

Steven Hayes: It was my own panic disorder that first put me on to the problem we have now confirmed in our research. My panic disorder began a little over 25 years ago. I watched in horror as it grew rapidly, simply by applying my normal problem solving skills to it. Anxiety felt awful and seemingly made it impossible to function, so it was obvious to me that I first needed to get rid of it before my life would improve. I tried lots of things to do that. But this very effort meant I had to constantly evaluate my level of anxiety, and fearfully check to see if it was going up or down as a result of my efforts. As a result, anxiety quickly became the central focus of my life. Anxiety itself became something to be anxious about, and meanwhile life was put on hold.

After two or three years of this I'd had enough. I began to experiment with acceptance, mindfulness, and valued action instead of detecting, disputing, and changing my insides.

I remember a moment that symbolizes the change in direction. In the middle of a panic attack, with a guttural scream like you hear in the movies, I literally shouted out loud to my own mind. "You can make me feel pain, you can make me feel anxiety," I yelled. "But you cannot make me turn away from my own experience."

It has not been a smooth path and it was several years before anxiety itself was obviously way down (getting it to go down was no longer my purpose, remember, but ironically when you stop trying to make it happen, often it does), but almost immediately life opened up again. ACT is the result of over 20 years of research, following the lead this provided.

Amazon.com: You are a language researcher and chapter two of Get Out of Your Mind and Into Your Life is called "Why Language Leads to Suffering." Can you tell us why you suggest that language is a source of human suffering?

Steven Hayes: Human language (by that I mean our symbolic abilities generally) is central to effective human cognition. It evolved to keep us from starving or being eaten--and it has done a pretty good job of that.

The key to symbolic processes is the ability to relate events in new and arbitrary ways. Our research program has shown this ability even in 14 month old babies, and we now know it comes from direct training from parents and others as part of normal language development. It is a wonderful skill. It allows us to imagine futures that have never been, and to compare situations that have never actually been experienced. That is the every essence of human verbal problem solving.

But that same process has a downside for human beings. For example, it allows us to fear things we have never experienced (e.g., death). It allows us to run from the past or compare the dull present to a fantasized future and to be unhappy as a result. And in my case it lead to the common sense but ultimately unhelpful idea that I needed to get rid of anxiety before I could live well.

We get a lot of training in how to develop and use our minds, but we get very little training in how to step out of the mental chatter when that is needed. As a result, this mental tool begins to use us. It will even claim to BE us. The overextension of human language and cognition, I believe, is at the core of the vast majority of human suffering in the developed world and human technology (the media) is only amplifying the problem by exposing us to an ever increasing stream of symbols and images. Learning how to get out of your mind and into your life when you need to do that is an essential skill in the modern world.""

_________________
Fill your bowl to the brim and it will spill. Keep sharpening your knife and it will blunt. Chase after money and security and your heart will never unclench. Care about people's approval and you will be their prisoner.
- Tao Te Ching


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 10, 2012 2:12 am 
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Translator

Joined: Tue Jul 31, 2012 9:33 am
Posts: 7
Thank you very much for sharing! Steve jobs' life is a great journey to get inspire yourself.

Hugs!


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 14, 2012 10:46 pm 
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Fresh Fish
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Joined: Sun Oct 14, 2012 10:42 am
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Location: Casa
The Myth of Self Help: The Dumbing Down of Complexity by Gerald Alper


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 26, 2012 2:12 am 
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Endgame Aficionado

Joined: Sat Sep 22, 2012 9:47 pm
Posts: 4
This book explains how to get out of your head:

http://soulwithoutshame.com


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 03, 2012 9:15 pm 
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Dr. Phil

Joined: Wed Jun 09, 2010 10:42 am
Posts: 234
Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse

Guys, this is a MUST READ!!!!
Basically it beautifully explains the foundations of buddhism in the story of the young Siddhartha, who leaves his wealthy family to find wisdom and eventually himself.

Reading this book greatly improved my understanding about spiritual development. Before you read practical stuff like Tolle read Siddhartha first and you will have a big picture to insert all this into.


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